X22Report: Define Psychological Projection, Something Big Is About To Happen – Episode 1918b

Define Psychological Projection, Something Big Is About To Happen – Episode 1918b

Published on Jul 16, 2019

https://youtu.be/8hvytjYYptA

Report date: 07.16.2019
The elite are panicking, the [DS], MSM are pushing the race card to distract from what is really happening. All part of the plan. Omar parents have a very interesting past. Did Trump tweet out his comments to bring attention to something we all should be looking at. The elite are now using excuses of why they were involved with Epstein, they are trying to get ahead of the story. MSM is now pushing stories about SR, JA, something big is about to happen, Watch the news. Q drops more bread, the [DS] wants division, define projection.

All source links to the report can be found on the x22report.com site.

Most of artwork that are included with these videos have been created by X22 Report and they are used as a representation of the subject matter. The representative artwork included with these videos shall not be construed as the actual events that are taking place.

Intro Video Music: YouTube Free Music: Cataclysmic Molten Core by Jingle Punks

Intro Music: YouTube Free Music: Warrior Strife by Jingle Punks

Prepare Today
My Patriot Supply
http://preparewithx22.com

Check Out The  X22 Report Spotlight YouTube Channel –
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1rn…

Join the X22 Report On Steemit: https://steemit.com/@x22report

Get economic collapse news throughout the day visit
http://x22report.com

Fair Use Notice: This video contains some copyrighted material whose use has not been authorized by the copyright owners. We believe that this not-for-profit, educational, and/or criticism or commentary use on the Web constitutes a fair use of the copyrighted material (as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use this copyrighted material for purposes that go beyond fair use, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. Fair Use notwithstanding we will immediately comply with any copyright owner who wants their material removed or modified, wants us to link to their web site, or wants us to add their photo.

The X22 Report is “one man’s opinion”. Anything that is said on the report is either opinion, criticism, information or commentary,  If making any type of investment or legal decision it would be wise to contact or consult a professional before making that decision.

Use the information found in these videos as a starting point for conducting your own research and conduct your own due diligence before making any significant investing decisions.

 

Benjamin Fulford: Economic and demographic data make it clear it is game over for the Khazarian mafia 8/15/16 | Geopolitical News

 
Notice to readers: Due to our annual holiday’s this week’s newsletter has been written in advance with non-time sensitive content


Recently, the Chinese government’s Xinhua news service reported that developing and emerging countries combined (the BRICS alliance) control 85% of the world’s population, 60% of its GDP and account for 80% of economic growth. In other words, the Khazarian mafia controlled countries have lost the battle both economically and demographically. Furthermore, the more time passes, the weaker their position gets.

 
If you look at World Bank data on real GDP (Purchasing Power Parity) you see that the members of the OECD’s (the rich countries club) total GDP is 50.9 trillion dollars while the rest of the world’s GDP is 127.3 trillion dollars. That means that even if all the rich countries allied themselves with the Khazarian faction ruling the US, they would have less than half the economic power of the BRICS alliance.

 
 
Things only get worse for the US once you realize the numbers used by the World Bank are based on lies put out by the US government. For example, if you look at US government data, it says that prices in 2016 are only 35% higher than they were in 2001. That is because the US government has changed the composition of the basket of goods it uses to measure inflation over 20 times to make the inflation rate look lower. If you look at more realistic measures of inflation you will see that US prices are 160% higher in 2016 than they were in 2001.

 


Since the inflation rate is used to calculate GDP, what this means is that real US GDP is worth less than half of what it was in 2001.

 
If you look at industrial production figures you can see that US industry has not grown since 1976. Click on the chart at this link and choose Max to see for yourself.




Then there is the fact that 22% of the US workforce worked in manufacturing in 1977 versus only 9% in 2016.




What this means is that most Americans are working in the service industry as public servants, or bank clerks or in restaurants and are not making anything that they can trade with the rest of the world.

 
That is why the US has been running a trade deficit almost non-stop since 1976. That is also why the US is the most indebted nation in the history of the planet. Again, you can see this by choosing Max in the link below.

 
 
This cumulative trade deficit has left the US owing the rest of the world more than 19 trillion dollars. If you look at the Rothschild controlled G7 group of countries as a whole you can see they owe the rest of the world $47.1 trillion.

 
 

What this means is that the G7 countries have been on a degenerate path for the last 40 years. The cause of this degeneracy can be traced back to the Nixon shock of 1972 when President Richard Nixon took the US dollar off the gold standard. Until 1972 the developed countries were experiencing strong economic growth under the gold standard. However, after Nixon dropped the gold standard, the G7 countries just started printing money out of thin air and using it to buy stuff from the rest of the world. This is the financial equivalent of using amphetamines. You get a huge immediate burst of energy but you are destroying your body in the process. The G7 reliance of fiat money turned them into huge parasites on the rest of the world.


The rest of the world is now having an immune reaction against this parasitical infection by the Khazarian controlled G7 countries. They are sick and tired of the continual anti-social behavior of the Khazarians. The United States is the world’s worst rogue nation and has been at war almost non-stop since the end of World War 2. The recent destruction of Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, Libya etc. by the Khazarian mafia and their puppets has shown the world their true nature. Not only that but, the Khazarians have tried on multiple occasions to start World War 3. For this reason most of the world is no longer willing to finance the countries they control.

 
 
It is true the US and the G7 have a more powerful military capability than China. This is especially true of the US air-force and navy. However, remember that at the beginning of World War 2 Japan had a stronger Navy than the US. However, US GDP was 4 times bigger than Japan’s and the US had twice the population. That meant that as soon as the Americans began retooling their economy for war it was only a matter of time before the Japanese lost.


Now China has four times the US population and produces 20 times more steel, the basic ingredient for weaponry. That means that if the Chinese decided to go for all out militarization, then it would be a matter of time before they won any conventional war.


Even with NATO, the Americans would not have the ability to win a war against China now and they know it from all the simulations they have carried out. Even if the US tried all out nuclear war, the Chinese can put most of their population in deep underground shelters whereas almost all Americans live in wooden houses and have no access to such shelter.


To prevent a total Chinese victory, the Americans have been courting the Russians and the countries around China to join them in an anti-Chinese alliance. However, the Russians remember what the Americans did to Yugoslavia and what they are now doing to the Ukraine and rightfully shun such an alliance. Not only that, they have actually agreed to carry out joint military exercises with China in the South China Sea. Furthermore, the European nations are also sick and tired of US behavior and are moving towards an alliance with Russia. In other words, the US under Khazarian rule has already lost World War 3.

 
So, what can be done to prevent China from totally dominating the planet? The answer is very simple, remove the Khazarian mafia from their final power bases in Israel, Saudi Arabia and the United States. Once this horrific infection has been removed from the US and world’s body politic, then the US can start to negotiate with the rest of the world to create a more equitable global architecture. In terms of population, the Chinese account for 20% of the world so that is the percentage of world power the Chinese would get if an inclusive world system was set up. This would replace the Rothschild and Rockefeller owned, pseudo-world government known as the United Nations.

 
Many people object to the idea of a world government because they associate it with the New World Order plan for a Khazarian controlled totalitarian world dictatorship. This is obviously not desirable. However, any village or town has certain rules such as do not murder, rape, steal or take a dump on the street. Right now the world does not have such rules (or rather the means to enforce them) and as a result the Khazarian criminals have been acting with impunity. We need at the very least the bare minimum to be able to stop international corporate crime syndicates from robbing and raping the planet at will. It means we could put people like George Bush in jail for mass murder because he invaded Iraq. It would also make it possible to have world peace. This is something we can accomplish as early as this autumn if we make a concerted push.

 
Via:


Source:

 

Nickel and Dimed in 2016: You Can’t Earn a Living on the Minimum Wage By Peter Van Buren


Nickel and Dimed in 2016:
You Can’t Earn a Living on the Minimum Wage

By Peter Van Buren
Posted by D.J. Apollo

http://kielarowski.net/2016/02/16/nickel-and-dimed-in-2016/#like-11671

When presidential candidate Bernie Sanders talks about income inequality, and when other candidates speak about the minimum wage and food stamps, what are they really talking about?

Whether they know it or not, it’s something like this.

My Working Life Then

A few years ago, I wrote about my experience enmeshed in the minimum-wage economy, chronicling the collapse of good people who could not earn enough money, often working 60-plus hours a week at multiple jobs, to feed their families. I saw that, in this country, people trying to make ends meet in such a fashion still had to resort to food benefit programs and charity. I saw an employee fired for stealing lunches from the break room refrigerator to feed himself. I watched as a co-worker secretly brought her two kids into the store and left them to wander alone for hours because she couldn’t afford childcare. (As it happens, 29% of low-wage employees are single parents.)

At that point, having worked at the State Department for 24 years, I had been booted out for being a whistleblower. I wasn’t sure what would happen to me next and so took a series of minimum wage jobs. Finding myself plunged into the low-wage economy was a sobering, even frightening, experience that made me realize just how ignorant I had been about the lives of the people who rang me up at stores or served me food in restaurants. Though millions of adults work for minimum wage, until I did it myself I knew nothing about what that involved, which meant I knew next to nothing about twenty-first-century America.

I was lucky. I didn’t become one of those millions of people trapped as the “working poor.” I made it out. But with all the election talk about the economy, I decided it was time to go back and take another look at where I had been, and where too many others still are.

My Working Life Now

I found things were pretty much the same in 2016 as they were in 2012, which meant — because there was no real improvement — that things were actually worse.

This time around, I worked for a month and a half at a national retail chain in New York City. While mine was hardly a scientific experiment, I’d be willing to bet an hour of my minimum-wage salary ($9 before taxes) that what follows is pretty typical of the New Economy.

Just getting hired wasn’t easy for this 56-year-old guy. To become a sales clerk, peddling items that were generally well under $50 a pop, I needed two previous employment references and I had to pass a credit check. Unlike some low-wage jobs, a mandatory drug test wasn’t part of the process, but there was a criminal background check and I was told drug offenses would disqualify me. I was given an exam twice, by two different managers, designed to see how I’d respond to various customer situations. In other words, anyone without some education, good English, a decent work history, and a clean record wouldn’t even qualify for minimum-wage money at this chain.

And believe me, I earned that money. Any shift under six hours involved only a 15-minute break (which cost the company just $2.25). Trust me, at my age, after hours standing, I needed that break and I wasn’t even the oldest or least fit employee. After six hours, you did get a 45-minute break, but were only paid for 15 minutes of it.

The hardest part of the job remained dealing with… well, some of you. Customers felt entitled to raise their voices, use profanity, and commit Trumpian acts of rudeness toward my fellow employees and me. Most of our “valued guests” would never act that way in other public situations or with their own coworkers, no less friends. But inside that store, shoppers seemed to interpret “the customer is always right” to mean that they could do any damn thing they wished. It often felt as if we were penned animals who could be poked with a stick for sport, and without penalty. No matter what was said or done, store management tolerated no response from us other than a smile and a “Yes, sir” (or ma’am).

The store showed no more mercy in its treatment of workers than did the customers. My schedule, for instance, changed constantly. There was simply no way to plan things more than a week in advance. (Forget accepting a party invitation. I’m talking about childcare and medical appointments.) If you were on the closing shift, you stayed until the manager agreed that the store was clean enough for you to go home. You never quite knew when work was going to be over and no cell phone calls were allowed to alert babysitters of any delay.

And keep in mind that I was lucky. I was holding down only one job in one store. Most of my fellow workers were trying to juggle two or three jobs, each with constantly changing schedules, in order to stitch together something like a half-decent paycheck.

In New York City, that store was required to give us sick leave only after we’d worked there for a full year — and that was generous compared to practices in many other locales. Until then, you either went to work sick or stayed home unpaid. Unlike New York, most states do not require such a store to offer any sick leave, ever, to employees who work less than 40 hours a week. Think about that the next time your waitress coughs.

Minimum Wages and Minimum Hours

Much is said these days about raising the minimum wage (and it should be raised), and indeed, on January 1, 2016, 13 states did raise theirs. But what sounds like good news is unlikely to have much effect on the working poor.

In New York, for instance, the minimum went from $8.75 an hour to the $9.00 I was making. New York is relatively generous. The current federal minimum wage is $7.25 and 21 states require only that federal standard. Presumably to prove some grim point or other, Georgia and Wyoming officially mandate an even lower minimum wage and then unofficially require the payment of $7.25 to avoid Department of Labor penalties. Some Southern states set no basement figure, presumably for similar reasons.

Don’t forget: any minimum wage figure mentioned is before taxes. Brackets vary, but let’s knock an even 10% off that hourly wage just as a reasonable guess about what is taken out of a minimum-wage worker’s salary. And there are expenses to consider, too. My round-trip bus fare every day, for instance, was $5.50. That meant I worked most of my first hour for bus fare and taxes. Keep in mind that some workers have to pay for childcare as well, which means that it’s not impossible to imagine a scenario in which someone could actually come close to losing money by going to work for short shifts at minimum wage.

In addition to the fundamental problem of simply not paying people enough, there’s the additional problem of not giving them enough hours to work. The two unfortunately go together, which means that raising the minimum rate is only part of any solution to improving life in the low-wage world.

At the store where I worked for minimum wage a few years ago, for instance, hours were capped at 39 a week. The company did that as a way to avoid providing the benefits that would kick in once one became a “full time” employee. Things have changed since 2012 — and not for the better.

Four years later, the hours of most minimum-wage workers are capped at 29. That’s the threshold after which most companies with 50 or more employees are required to pay into the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) fund on behalf of their workers. Of course, some minimum wage workers get fewer than 29 hours for reasons specific to the businesses they work for.

It’s Math Time

While a lot of numbers follow, remember that they all add up to a picture of how people around us are living every day.

In New York, under the old minimum wage system, $8.75 multiplied by 39 hours equaled $341.25 a week before taxes. Under the new minimum wage, $9.00 times 29 hours equals $261 a week. At a cap of 29 hours, the minimum wage would have to be raised to $11.77 just to get many workers back to the same level of take-home pay that I got in 2012, given the drop in hours due to the Affordable Care Act. Health insurance is important, but so is food.

In other words, a rise in the minimum wage is only half the battle; employees need enough hours of work to make a living.

About food: if a minimum wage worker in New York manages to work two jobs (to reach 40 hours a week) without missing any days due to illness, his or her yearly salary would be $18,720. In other words, it would fall well below the Federal Poverty Line of $21,775. That’s food stamp territory. To get above the poverty line with a 40-hour week, the minimum wage would need to go above $10. At 29 hours a week, it would need to make it to $15 an hour. Right now, the highest minimum wage at a state level is in the District of Columbia at $11.50. As of now, no state is slated to go higher than that before 2018. (Some cities do set their own higher minimum wages.)

So add it up: The idea of raising the minimum wage (“the fight for $15”) is great, but even with that $15 in such hours-restrictive circumstances, you can’t make a loaf of bread out of a small handful of crumbs. In short, no matter how you do the math, it’s nearly impossible to feed yourself, never mind a family, on the minimum wage. It’s like being trapped on an M.C. Escher staircase.

The federal minimum wage hit its high point in 1968 at $8.54 in today’s dollars and while this country has been a paradise in the ensuing decades for what we now call the “One Percent,” it’s been downhill for low-wage workers ever since. In fact, since it was last raised in 2009 at the federal level to $7.25 per hour, the minimum has lost about 8.1% of its purchasing power to inflation. In other words, minimum-wage workers actually make less now than they did in 1968, when most of them were probably kids earning pocket money and not adults feeding their own children.

In adjusted dollars, the minimum wage peaked when the Beatles were still together and the Vietnam War raged.

Who Pays?

Many of the arguments against raising the minimum wage focus on the possibility that doing so would put small businesses in the red. This is disingenuous indeed, since 20 mega-companies dominate the minimum-wage world. Walmart alone employs 1.4 million minimum-wage workers;Yum Brands (Taco Bell, Pizza Hut, KFC) is in second place; and McDonald’s takes third. Overall, 60% of minimum-wage workers are employed by businesses not officially considered “small” by government standards, and of course carve-outs for really small businesses are possible, as was done with Obamacare.

Keep in mind that not raising wages costs you money.

Those minimum wage workers who can’t make enough and need to go on food assistance? Well, Walmart isn’t paying for those food stamps (now called SNAP), you are. The annual bill that states and the federal government foot for working families making poverty-level wages is $153 billion. A single Walmart Supercenter costs taxpayers between $904,542 and $1.75 million per year in public assistance money, and Walmart employees account for 18% of all food stamps issued. In other words, those everyday low prices at the chain are, in part, subsidized by your tax money.

If the minimum wage goes up, will spending on food benefits programs go down? Almost certainly. But won’t stores raise prices to compensate for the extra money they will be shelling out for wages? Possibly. But don’t worry — raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour would mean a Big Mac would cost all of 17 cents more.

Time Theft

My retail job ended a little earlier than I had planned, because I committed time theft.

You probably don’t even know what time theft is. It may sound like something from a sci-fi novel, but minimum-wage employers take time theft seriously. The basic idea is simple enough: if they’re paying you, you’d better be working. While the concept is not invalid per se, the way it’s used by the mega-companies reveals much about how the lowest wage workers are seen by their employers in 2016.

The problem at my chain store was that its in-store cafe was a lot closer to my work area than the time clock where I had to punch out whenever I was going on a scheduled break. One day, when break time on my shift came around, I only had 15 minutes. So I decided to walk over to that cafe, order a cup of coffee, and then head for the place where I could punch out and sit down (on a different floor at the other end of the store).

We’re talking an extra minute or two, no more, but in such operations every minute is tabulated and accounted for. As it happened, a manager saw me and stepped in to tell the cafe clerk to cancel my order. Then, in front of whoever happened to be around, she accused me of committing time theft — that is, of ordering on the clock. We’re talking about the time it takes to say, “Grande, milk, no sugar, please.” But no matter, and getting chastised on company time was considered part of the job, so the five minutes we stood there counted as paid work.

At $9 an hour, my per-minute pay rate was 15 cents, which meant that I had time-stolen perhaps 30 cents. I was, that is, being nickel and dimed to death.

Economics Is About People

It seems wrong in a society as wealthy as ours that a person working full-time can’t get above the poverty line. It seems no less wrong that someone who is willing to work for the lowest wage legally payable must also give up so much of his or her self-respect and dignity as a kind of tariff. Holding a job should not be a test of how to manage life as one of the working poor.

I didn’t actually get fired for my time theft. Instead, I quit on the spot. Whatever the price is for my sense of self-worth, it isn’t 30 cents. Unlike most of this country’s working poor, I could afford to make such a decision. My life didn’t depend on it. When the manager told a handful of my coworkers watching the scene to get back to work, they did. They couldn’t afford not to.

Peter Van Buren blew the whistle on State Department waste and mismanagement during the “reconstruction” of Iraq in his book We Meant Well: How I Helped Lose the Battle for the Hearts and Minds of the Iraqi People. A TomDispatch regular, he writes about current events at We Meant Well. His latest book is Ghosts of Tom Joad: A Story of the #99Percent. His next work will be a novel, Hooper’s War.

Copyright 2016 Peter Van Buren

https://medium.com/@TomDispatch/tomgram-peter-van-buren-minimum-wage-minimum-chance-2eb3f6631cbe#.hwm40y3fo

The lottery and social despair in America by Andre Damon

The lottery and social despair in America
by Andre Damon

posted by DJ Apollo
9 January 2015

powerball-web

9 January 2015

“This mania, so generally condemned, has never been properly studied. No one has realized that it is the opium of the poor. Did not the lottery, the mightiest fairy in the world, work up magical hopes? The roll of the roulette wheel that made the gamblers glimpse masses of gold and delights did not last longer than a lightning flash; whereas the lottery spread the magnificent blaze of lightning over five whole days. Where is the social force today that, for forty sous, can make you happy for five days and bestow on you—at least in fancy—all the delights that civilization holds?”

~Balzac, La Rabouilleuse, 1842

 

The jackpot in the US Powerball lottery has hit $800 million, since there were no winners in Wednesday’s drawing. In the current round, which began on December 2, over 431 million tickets have been sold, a figure substantially larger than America’s population.

Go into any corner store in America and you will see workers of every age and race waiting in line to buy lottery tickets. With the current round, the lines are longer than ever. Americans spend over $70 billion on lottery tickets each year. In West Virginia, America’s second-poorest state, the average person spent $658.46 on lottery tickets last year.

Powerball players pick six random numbers when they purchase their tickets, with a certain percentage of sales going to the jackpot. If no winning ticket is sold, the jackpot rolls over to the next round.

The totals for the Mega Millions and Powerball national lotteries have been growing every year. This year’s jackpot has eclipsed 2012’s record of $656.5 million, the $390 million payout in 2007 and the $363 million prize in 2000. The jackpots have grown in direct proportion to ticket sales.

State-run gambling programs such as Powerball have been promoted by Democrats and Republicans alike as a solution to state budget shortfalls, even as the politicians slash taxes on corporations and wealthy individuals and gut social programs. From the standpoint of government revenue, lotteries and casinos are nothing more than a back-door regressive tax, soaking up money from the poor in proportion to the growth of social misery.

The boom in lotteries is global. Lottery sales grew 9.9 percent worldwide in 2014, after growing 4.9 percent in 2013.

Psychology Professor Kate Sweeny has noted that lottery sales grow when people feel a lack of control over their lives, particularly over their economic condition. “That feeling of self-control is very important to psychological well-being,” Sweeny says.

There is ample reason for American workers to feel they have no control over their lives. According a recent survey by Bankrate.com, more than half of Americans do not have enough cash to cover an unexpected expense of $500 or more—roughly the price of four name-brand tires.

Some 62 percent of Americans have savings of less than $1,000, and 21 percent do not have any savings at all. Most Americans are one medical emergency or one spell of unemployment from financial ruin.

For all the talk about “economic recovery” by the White House, the real financial state of most American households is far worse than before the 2008 financial crisis and recession. As of 2013, Americans were almost 40 percent poorer than they were in 2007, according to a recent survey by the Pew Research Center. While a large portion of the decline in household wealth is attributable to the collapse of the housing bubble, falling wages and chronic mass unemployment have played major roles.

The yearly income of a typical US household dropped by a massive 12 percent, or $6,400, in the six years between 2007 and 2013, according to the Federal Reserve’s latest survey of consumer finances. A large share of this decline has taken place during the so-called recovery presided over by the Obama administration.

In addition to becoming poorer, America has become much more economically polarized. According to a separate Pew survey, for the first time in more than four decades “middle-income households” no longer constitute the majority of American society. Instead, the majority of households are either low- or high-income. Pew called its findings “a demographic shift that could signal a tipping point” in American society.

“Is the lottery the new American dream?” asked USA Today, commenting on this month’s Powerball jackpot. The observation is truer than the authors intended. For American workers, achieving the “American Dream” of a stable job and one’s own home is becoming increasingly unrealizable.

Following more than 10 million foreclosures during the financial crisis, America’s home ownership rate has hit the lowest level in two decades, and for young households, the rate of home ownership is the lowest it has been since the 1960s.

For the tens of millions of America’s poor, and the more than 100 million on the threshold of poverty, the dream of winning the lottery has replaced the “American Dream” of living a decent life. A lottery ticket is a chance to escape to a fantasy world where money is not a constant, nagging worry, where one is not insulted and bullied at a low-wage job by bosses whose pay is matched only by their incompetence. The lottery is, as Balzac aptly described it, the “opium of the poor.”

Using the same phrase to describe religion, Marx noted that the “illusory happiness of the people” provided by the solace of religion is, in fact, a silent protest and distorted “demand for their real happiness.”

Andre Damon