Rest, Retreat, and Balance at the Fall Equinox

Rest eludes many of us, but time out, resting in nature is perhaps the most healing -inaction- we can (not) do!

The Druid's Garden

I don’t know about you, but 2020 has been a hell of a year.  Usually, the Fall Equinox and the coming of the dark half of the year is a time for celebration, as Fall is my favorite season. But this year, the idea of moving into the dark half of the year when so much has already been dark is hard.  We have so much loss, death, employment insecurity, health insecurity, food insecurity, sickness, political unrest….the list goes on and on. Here in the US in particular, things are really difficult and many are dealing with basic issues to security, including financial security, food security, health security, and obviously, a lot of isolation. So, given these challenges, I think its important to fall back on our spiritual practices for nurturing, support, and grounding and embrace what the season offers. The Fall Equinox, as a time of balance, can help…

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White Picket Fences, Free Range Fantasies, and the Many Paths of Sustainable Living

Thank you for speaking up about this. I won’t feel so left out now. I have often felt that the grass was greener elsewhere. Currently, I don’t have a deck or sunny yard or garden. I think an alternative for many of us (especially single people and renters) could be to join with friends and neighbors to share community gardens. Many towns and cities provide plots at low or no cost for gardening. Yes, there is often a wait-list, but I also know of people who create community gardens in their yard, sharing efforts and harvest with neighbors. Because I move a lot and work most days, and my work physical, I have not pursued this myself. After I moved here last fall, I was hoping when the trees filled in during the Spring, there would still be plenty of sun in the back yard for growing vegetables, but it is shady. Still, I can probably manage a small container garden in the limited sunny spots, and I do grow culinary and medicinal herbs on my windowsills. Meanwhile, I am always happy to support sustainable growers by visiting my local Farmer’s Markets when I can, which gives me more bang for my buck (quality, quantity and/or price), so I see that as a win-win.

Permaculture!

 

The Druid's Garden

We live in a time of grand and sweeping narratives, powerful narratives that tell us who to be, how to live, what to buy, and what to believe–and these shape our actions and identities. When I was a child in the 1980’s, the narrative of the American Dream, complete with the white picket fence, was compelling. A beautiful suburban home, a middle class lifestyle, a loving partner, 2.5 children, a large house, a beautiful lawn, the husband with a well paying job, and generally peaceful existence were the cornerstones of this dream. Of course, there’s a lot of critique of the white picket fence today, spanning from racial injustice and socioeconomic realities to sustainable living issues. In the sustainability community, in particular, the white picket fence has become a sense of what we are working against, as the white picket fence surrounds the chemically-treated and weed free grass…and certainly…

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